Globalists hate the idea of nationalism

President Trump when talking about the caravan and his moves to defend the southern border with Mexico recently stated:

“You know they have a word, it sort of became old-fashioned, it’s called ‘nationalist.’ And I said, really? We’re not supposed to use that word. You know what I am? I’m a nationalist, OK? I’m a nationalist.”

At the commemoration of the 100th anniversary of Armistice Day marking the end of World War I over the weekend French President Emmanuel Macron said this in regards to President Trump’s statement :

“Patriotism is the exact opposite of nationalism. Nationalism is a betrayal of patriotism by saying ‘our interests first, who cares about the others.’ We erase what a nation holds dearest, what gives it life, what makes it grace, and what is essential – its moral values.“

What is the alternative to nationalism and why has that word taken on such a negative connotation?

The definition of nationalism from a political standpoint is: A political, social, and economic system characterized by the promotion of the interests of a particular nation, especially with the aim of gaining and maintaining sovereignty over the homeland.

The first synonym is patriotism.

The flip side of nationalism is globalism, which Macron and other EU member leaders must need to subscribe to since they cannot defend their borders from what Brussels dictates to them.

Macron, Merkel et al have lost their sovereignty to unelected officials dictating policies of what France or Germany et al will do. Think of the refugees changing the face of Europe.

When does nationalism turn into an extreme form marked by a feeling of superiority over other countries? When the native citizens begin to feel powerless over dictates that they have no recourse from these rules affecting their lives.

Macron may be too young to remember — perhaps he should ask his wife — how American troops freed the French from occupation during the two world wars, since their patriots were unable to defend their homeland.

Now of course Brussels is quite worried that Trump’s tariffs will correct the many years that the EU took advantage of loop-sided US trade policies. So they sent their French puppet out to take a jab at the American president.

President Trump should remember you only take flak when you are over the target.

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Divided government doesn’t have to be divisive

Welcome to 2018 AM — after midterms.

The House of Representatives goes to Democratic control, but by a smaller majority than is usually accomplished by the party not in the White House in the midterm election.

The Republicans, however, gained further control of the Senate, which is where many of the ongoing investigations that began in the House of the intelligence agencies will move to in January.

Given that the blue wave was somewhat muted, The Dems should think about bringing in some fresh blood in its leadership roles. Moderates, who will be around in the next 10 years and ran on something more than being anti-Trump. If not, and the plan is to be obstructionist, then we could easily see a reversal in two years.

If the Dem leadership pursues impeachment hearings against President Trump and or Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh, which will go nowhere since the Republicans control the Senate, then it will be a long, unfruitful two years of gridlock.

Something that the country will endure, but it will not improve the economy or anyone’s lives. The markets like divided government since very little regulation comes out of it, but people’s lives suffer, since little in the way of benefits come to light either.

So we move on and see what can be finished with this session of Congress and more importantly, what Special Counsel Robert Mueller has to say about the 2016 presidential election.

Election Day will be glorious

Election Day is upon us and just as if it was the 2016 presidential election, the pollsters are all in agreement the Democrats will win the House majority.

They believe they can never lose.

The political website ­FiveThirtyEight tabulated that Democrats have an 87.5 percent chance of winning back the House. Mind you this is the same website, run by Nate Silver,  that said Hilary Clinton had a 95%+ chance of winning the White House the day before the election.

As I wrote over the weekend, I see the Democrats winning their existing seats by a larger margin as voters in the darker blue states come out in bigger numbers to vote. However in the vast majority of the interior of the US, the Republicans will retain their seats and control of the House.

Putting aside the anti-Trump wing — or majority — of the Democratic Party, most people vote with their pocketbook. Wages and job growth are two important data points for any American to disregard.

If the Democrats had an economic plan for the future, then I have not heard it put forth by any candidate running in my area. That includes New York state Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Lots of additional spending to buy votes, but no concrete plans on how to pay for it. The old tax and spend playbook.

My election night coverage is usually spent watching the stock futures market, since there is huge money being “wagered” on the outcome and they have the best unbiased polling data in the country.

So my hope for this Election Day is the peaceful civic responsibility of all Americans to get out and vote and somewhere around 10 pm Tuesday night we should know what the next two years will be.

I believe it will be glorious.

Stocks up, wages up, unemployment down. How could the Midterms be close?

As a financial writer in real life, I find it odd that the economy is not being ballyhooed by the Republicans more during this Midterm election. Or should I say not mentioned in the media more.

Stocks, as measured by the Dow Jones industrial average, are up 25% since President Trump was elected.

No the only focus the stock markets get nowadays is the recent gyrations in October, which also overshadowed the latest wage data showing a pay raise of more than 3% according toLabor Department data released Wednesday. The wage gains make sense since there is now a decades-low unemployment rate.

An argument could be made that the recent stock pullback story has much to do with a concern that the Democrats could possibly win the House of Representatives.

Certainly Wall Street has a growing concern that Rep. Maxine Waters could take over the leadership of the House Banking Committee. The same Maxine Waters who told protestors to go after Administration members of Republican members of Congress if you see them in a restaurant or the movie theater.

It’s not a question of impeachment, because that will never be in the cards, since the Democrats will never have enough votes to get charges brought and passed onto the Senate. No the real question is what do the Democrats stand for economically?

There’s very little evidence of any economic platform or any platform except being anti-Trump. But no one calls them out on this.

A perfect example of this is in San Francisco, where the Democratic Mayor and city council want to raise real estate and business taxes to stem the tide of growing homeless people defecating in the streets among other quality-of-life issues.

Left-leaning Silicon Valley firms like Google and Amazon among others are squawking over having to pay more taxes. Threatening to move out of the city if they are forced to pony up cash to alleviate a problem they caused by moving in and distorting the cost of housing in the Bay Area.

So where is the left’s economic thought? Clearly tax and spend doesn’t resonate with its biggest boosters — California tech companies.

And I would say it does not sit well with many institutional investors as well.

Most Americans will #WalkAway from the whole midterm vote

What can we expect coming out of the midterms next week?

As Blexit and WalkAway movements of the right attempt to counteract the voter registration drives and the get out the vote campaigns being employed by the left, will the American people turnout in greater numbers than the average off-year election.

For presidential elections the average turnout is around 60% and for the midterms it falls to around 40%. Given the recent rhetoric and events of late October — Pittsburgh shooting, Honduran caravan and stock market gyrations — it may actually backfire on getting out the vote.

As the left pins every ill on President Trump — including his going to Pittsburgh for a symbolic gesture of unity with the victims and some families — many may say, “Why vote, Trump is not running.”

Given this division, I have a sense that turnout will be on the lower end, slightly below the 40% level. Many Americans have a distaste for the actions of both parties so much that they will turn their back on the whole idea of voting.

It can’t be called malaise, because new segments of the population are supercharged to effect change. Most of these voters however live in an area that is represented by the party they believe in.

Given this premise, the activists on both sides of the aisle will get to the polls. So the Congressional races may be more lopsided than normal in the winning vote percentage. However, there will not be many seats flipping parties since most democratic seats are already in the hands of the party and visa versa.

Come a week from now the sun will rise on an America with little change and a majority of the population saying to themselves, “See it didn’t really matter that I didn’t vote.”