Consumers credit crunch changes retail picture more than Amazon

The state of the consumer can be summed up in two pieces of data that were released this week.

First, total US household debt was $12.84 trillion in the three months to June, up $552 billion from a year ago, according to the New York Federal Reserve Bank report published on Tuesday. Almost 5% of that sum or $600 billion of that debt is in default.

Secondly, the only retailers to have decent earnings this week were the off-price stores. TJ Maxx, which owns that brand along with Marshall’s and Home Goods, beat profit estimates and guided higher, while being one of the few retail chains to be opening new stores.

Target was the other bright spot for the retail sector as it also beat the Street’s revenue and profit forecasts by remodeling stores and ramping up 2-day delivery services.

The off-price retail sector is booming when you compare it to Macy’s, Nordstrom and other department stores, as consumers look to price versus brands. While Amazon’s pricing could be included in the sector, it has less to do with the department’s stores demise than the credit crunch.

A line in the Fed report sticks out to me, which said the growing number of credit cards balances maxed out “ticked up notably.” This is the canary for cash-strapped consumers, who earlier reports from the Fed said were making more credit card purchases for everyday staples like gas and groceries.

Is this a matter of convenience or is the credit card used as a bridge to pick up milk on the Wednesday before payday?

Not sure if an answer to that can be derived, but it points in an ominous direction when you take into account that real wages have been flat on an inflation basis for over a decade at the very least.

 

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