One bad teacher a day this year

Many of my readers know I am no fan of the teachers’ unions.

I have cited numerous times how the unions thwart improvements to schools.

Well here is another example of this:

At least 181 K-12 educators, including four principals, were arrested on child sex-related crimes in the U.S. in the first six months of 2022, ranging from child pornography to raping students.

An recently released report looked at local news stories week by week featuring arrests of principals, teachers, substitute teachers and teachers’ aides on child sex-related crimes in school districts across the country. Arrests that weren’t publicized were not counted in the analysis, meaning the true number may well be higher.

The analysis found that at least 181 have been arrested between January 1 and June 30, which works out to exactly an arrest a day on average. 

At least 140 of the arrests, or 77%, involved alleged crimes against students. 

Men also made up the vast majority – 78% – of the arrests.

Many of the arrests involved especially heinous allegations.

The analysis comes after the U.S. Department of Education released a report last month, titled, “Study of State Policies to Prohibit Aiding and Abetting Sexual Misconduct in Schools,” which analyzed state policies prohibiting “passing the trash,” or allowing suspected sexual abusers to quietly leave their jobs to possibly offend again in a different school district.

A bipartisan provision of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), which was originally proposed by Republican Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, requires all states receiving federal education funding to enact law prohibiting the practice of “passing the trash.”

The Education Department’s report, however, found that laws against the practice are varied across the states, and that while all states require prospective employers to conduct criminal background checks on educators, and most states – 46 – require fingerprinting, only 19 states require employers to request information from an applicants’ current and former employers. 

Moreover, only 14 states require employers to check an applicant’s eligibility for employment or certification, and 11 require applicants to disclose information regarding investigations or disciplinary actions related to sexual abuse or misconduct.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.