Time for the Anti-Social Social Media bill

It is time for the Anti-Social Social Media bill to be brought in Congress. Twitter, Facebook, Goggle along with YouTube, Apple, Amazon and Microsoft along with some fulfillment providers need to be reigned in.

The fact that these companies over the last weekend were able to silence the President and in a coordinated effort shut down or throttled back other right-leaning websites shows that they have operated as duopolies with possible anti-trust violations.

Congress doesn’t need to do away with section 230 provision of the Communication Decency Act, which protects thrsr platforms from being sued over user posts, Congress needs a new bill that regulates these services by social media companies under the heading of a utility.

When was the last time you were denied phone or electric service because of something you said or wrote on your phone or computer? No, utilities are essential services that need to be provided to all. Access to the global town square should be classified as an essential service in 2021.

Google and Apple should have their App Stores spun out of the companies and run by a developers group so they cannot just eliminate platforms by pulling down these competing apps.

Amazon and Microsoft web and cloud services also need to be regulated or sold off so they are not being used as an integral part of last weekend’s cabal attack on conservative voices.

Listen, Judge HaroldĀ  Green in 1984 tore apart Ma Bell over similar monopolistic circumstances. Now you have six companies determining whose speech will be heard in the largest public square ever created.

The fact that Twitter took The New York Post’s account down for 10 days in Oct. when they broke the Hunter Biden laptop story right before the election is unthinkable.

Then last week during the Capitol Hill protest President Trump tweets that his supporters should respect the police and go home and Twitter pulls that down saying it is inciting violence. It was the complete opposite. Trump was asking for calm.

The capital markets are unable to regulate this anti-social cabal as I wrote yesterday. While Twitter shares were down 10 percent in the futures market, the stock came back as investors realized that CEO Jack Dorsey’s firm had eliminated or hamstrung its viable competitors in Parlor and Gab.

Congress needs to act on this now. If these large public companies have no obligation to protect First Amendment rights, then it’s time for Washington to stand up for our rights.

On a personal note, Gray’s Economy took a huge hit traffic Monday due to the purge of conservative and right-leaning users. If you want to continue seeing these daily missives please subscribe to this site and you will get the link in your in box.